This is OUR team…this is why we Play.

At this point, the list of things that Coach Yow knew is very long. And it grows each day.

Today is day 9 of the 2018 Play4Kay official window. Today’s realization: Coach Yow envisioned Play4Kay as she did because she knew teams would accomplish more than individuals. So true.

More to the point, she knew it would take a team to beat cancer. Even more true.

Sharon Versyp, Beth Courture and Terry Kix are a team. They are three members of the Purdue women’s basketball coaching staff who have battled cancer. So far, their record is 3-0 against cancer.

In March 2009, Beth was diagnosed with breast cancer. At the time, she was head coach at Butler University. She almost canceled her doctor’s appointment because the team had gotten in late the night before. Thankfully, she did not cancel. Her life changed that day and, though they didn’t realize it yet, so did the lives of Terry Kix and Sharon Versyp.

Fast forward. It is the week before Thanksgiving 2012, Terry is diagnosed with stage 3 stomach cancer. She immediately went into fight mode. She saw cancer as the opponent, an opponent with a 90-95% chance of besting her. It was grueling. The odds indicated a Daniel versus Goliath match up. The odds were wrong.

When Sharon was diagnosed with breast cancer in March 2017, Beth and Terry became her teammates in a way that perhaps no other adversity could have crystalized or magnified. They understood what Sharon’s daily journey consisted of and were able to come along side her in the midst of the battle.

Three women. Three separate and very different battles. Three wins. One team.

On every team, there are different roles. Each important, each has their time, their contribution. In the fight against cancer, we all have a role to play, a piece to contribute.

For the last 9 days, we have been in the official Play4Kay window. It is the ultimate team event. Teams from across the country, working together, to get the biggest win – the win against cancer.

This is the way Coach Yow saw it. All of us teaming up to beat cancer. When we Play4Kay, we play for each other. We play for those who have battled, those who are battling.  We know there are battles still to come – we are playing for those too.

As we Play4Kay, look around you…sometimes the women we are battling for are the same ones we are battling with. Know your teammates. Who do you Play4?

#PLAY4KAY

To donate to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund, click here.

The Sound of Hope…

If you listen to Angel Elderkin’s heart, it likely sounds like the steady bounce of a basketball. She is a coach. Her players, her staff, are family. Basketball is life.

The ball bounces.

They say when you have a life-threatening experience, you see your life flash in front of your eyes. If that is the case, a cancer diagnosis probably causes your priorities to flash in front of your eyes at lightspeed.

The word cancer is spoken, like it has been said a million times before, only this time someone was speaking to you, about you. The ball bounces quicker, much quicker. Now you are in a full court press, you are racing the clock. The only thing is, you do not know exactly how much time is on the clock.

Angel Elderkin was diagnosed with stage 3 endometrial cancer after a series of health concerns and a month of tests resulted in an eventual diagnosis. Now her priorities crystalized into a string of questions:

How would she tell her team?

What about the upcoming season?

Would there ever be a day as normal as yesterday? Ever.

Maybe those were the first questions because they were the most basic to her day to day life. Maybe those were the first because she would not allow herself to ask round 2:

What would the course of treatment be?

What were the implications for fertility?

What were the odds of survival?

At some point, the ball started to bounce at a slightly less feverish pace. She attacked cancer as a true coach. She scouted her opponent, created a game plan, and then put the long tough days it would take to win.

Telling her team was one of the hardest points. She remembers that day and can not describe the moment in detail, the intensity of emotion was so great. “I had to get in front of them, tell them the truth, see their emotion back, be vulnerable with my own emotion, but then reassure them I would be okay. Everyone in the room had different reactions. They all have been touched in some way,” she recalls.

There was the surgery, a full hysterectomy, chemotherapy, and rounds of radiation. It was intense, but so were her people.

The outpouring of support from her team, the Appalachian State community, the national community of women’s basketball coaches…the cadence of balls bouncing from across the country, the rhythm of encouragement, the sound of hope.

 

To donate to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund, click here.